Windhoek

Days 1 - 2

Windhoek is Namibia's social, economic and political capital, with its sprawling urban core that dominates the surrounding landscape. While it is not generally considered a tourist destination, many travellers use Windhoek as an entry or exit point for Namibia. The rich history, culture and fantastic food make visiting this city an incredibly unique experience. Windhoek is one of the cleanest cities in Africa and offers a wide range of attractions. Cleanliness, well-structured infrastructure and a thriving cultural community are what makes this town flourish in its own traditional way. 

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Windhoek

Sossusvlei

Days 2 - 4

If you only have time to see one thing in Namibia, make it the soaring sand dunes of Sossusvlei. Few words can describe the towering red dunes spread across the landscape, or walking amongst the fossilised Acacia trees in the vast white clay pan of Deadvlei. The ever-changing dunes are the arid lands most iconic feature, and hiking to the tops will allow you to view the Martian-like landscape below. Sossuvlei shows off its beauty by housing many plants and animals that have adapted to life in the dry, yet dreamy terrain. This natural wonder is a perfect example of Namibia's unspoiled desert landscape. 

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Sossusvlei

Swakopmund

Days 4 - 6

Nestled on the west coast of the Namib Desert - where the dunes meet the ocean - is the popular little town of Swakopmund. This laid-back area offers charm in bucket loads with its colonial architecture, quaint restaurants and historic landmarks - such as the "Mole" sunset pier. The cobbled streets and picturesque buildings indicate the rich heritage and culture this town holds, while the museums show its diverse history. This area radiates personality - from the more relaxed daytime charm to the vibrant atmosphere of the night - this is one of Namibia's hidden gems that need to be experienced. 

Twyfelfontein

Days 6 - 7

Twyfelfontein is a site of ancient rock engravings in the semi-arid region of north-western Namibia. This world heritage site is situated 100 kilometres from the ocean, where the scenery shifts from dry red sands to lush grassland. Drawn by the San People, the engravings show depictions of both human and animal tracks. Many of the impressions also depict animals that are no longer found in the area - including lion, zebra, kudu and even seals! Visiting these paintings, with their rich historical and cultural backgrounds, allows you to learn about the Namibian heritage and the San people's customs and beliefs. 

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Twyfelfontein

Etosha South

Days 7 - 9

Etosha's southernmost section is home to Etosha South. This area is known for its rich population of both white and black rhino. Etosha South is home to the Okaukuejo Rest Camp, which is famous for its floodlit waterhole. The many viewpoints overlook picturesque bush-scapes and abundant wildlife. Getting into the South is accessible by Andersson's Gate. Here, visitors can expect to see many animals, including lion and the rare black-faced impala. However, the most notable of animals found here are elephants. Enjoy guided nature walks, game drives, or simply watching the sunset from this breath-taking location.

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Etosha South

Otavi Mountain Region

Days 9 - 10

The Otavi Mountain Region is sometimes referred to as the "Golden Triangle", or as the "maize Triangle". Features of interest include the Hoba Meteorite and sink holes and underground lakes. The Hoba Meteorite is the largest meteorite in the world, and the largest naturally occurring piece of iron on the Earth's surface. It is made of nickel-iron and weighs about 60 tonnes. Lake Otjikoto and Lake Guinas are sinkholes the depths of which are not really known and nearby is the Dragon’s Breath one of the largest and deepest underground lakes in the world. It was here just outside Otavi that World War I ended in southern Africa on July 1 1915.

Otavi Mountain Region

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Otavi Mountain Region

Rundu

Days 10 - 11

Located on the northeastern tip of Namibia - the rapidly growing town of Rundu is a central administrative and economic hub in the region. Renowned for its goat, millet and cattle farming, the boom of tourism in Rundu results from the town's easy accessibility. In many ways, woodcarving artefacts have become a symbol of the town. Visitors can purchase any number of wooden items, from cutlery and bowls to ornaments and animals. The small town of Rundu, with its flat plains and sandy roads, is a fun-filled stop-over for those travelling between Etosha, Windhoek and the Okavango Delta.

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Rundu

Kwando River

Days 11 - 13

Rising in the central Angolan highlands and east of the Kunene River is the Kwando River, forming the boundary between Namibia, Angola and Zambia. This river is the lifeblood of this region, and its fresh grasses support large herds of animals, most notably the Burchell's Zebra. Activities in the area include boat cruises, guided bushwalks and game drives. The surrounding land is pristine, largely uninhabited, and its beauty remains relatively undiscovered. Soak up the charm of the river nestled beneath a canopy of shady jackalberry trees, or listen to the sounds of the hippo's grunt as your boat sails past.

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Kwando River

Victoria Falls (Zimbabwe)

Days 13 - 15

Victoria Falls is a magnificent sight of awe-inspiring beauty on the Zambezi River, forming the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. The vast, basalt cliffs over which the falls thunder turn the Zambezi from a placid river into rapids that carve their way through dramatic gorges. The falls have been declared a National Park and World Heritage Site and are also one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. At the falls, you'll find activities like swimming, bungee jumping, and zip-lining. Additionally, there are calmer activities, including sunset cruises, walking tours and elephants interactions. 

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Victoria Falls (Zimbabwe)

Kasane Forest Reserve

Days 15 - 17

Fringing the world-renowned Chobe National Park, the Kasane Forest Reserve is located in the Lesoma Valley of the Central district in Botswana, approximately 800 kilometres north from Gaborone. A large portion of the terrain around the reserve is flat with plenty of wildlife, such as elephants, giraffes and even warthogs, roaming around undisturbed. Visitors can look forward to scenic boat cruises along the beautiful Chobe River, spot nocturnal animals in the forest on a thrilling night safari and enjoy bush camping under the African night sky.

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Kasane Forest Reserve

Nata

Days 17 - 18

Nata is a village in Botswana's central district. It is situated at a crossroads between routes north and west and provides a stop-over for those travelling to Maun. Nata is dotted by Mokolwane palms, where the river delta feeds into the Sua Pan, a place of refuge for those seeking peace and quiet. Here, four-wheel drives to the salt pans are a fun way to explore the area. The bird sanctuary is a community project and a must to visit! It is home to 165 bird species, including flamingoes and pelicans. Many accommodation options are available to travellers, including game reserves, lodges, hotels and camping sites. 

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Nata

Gweta

Days 18 - 20

Gweta is in a small village in the Okavango-Chobe region of Botswana, generally considered the gateway to the Makgadikgadi Pans. It derived its name from the sound of croaking bullfrogs, which bury themselves in the sand until the rainy season arrives. Camping and upmarket lodging are both available. Many lodges offer guided tours and overnight camps on the salt pans, walks around the baobab trees, and a cultural visit to the local village. Activities of the area include game viewing, guided walks, and horseback rides. However, Gweta's gigantic Baobab trees are the attraction that leaves visitors speechless. 

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Gweta

Moremi Game Reserve

Days 20 - 22

Moremi Game Reserve is a protected area in Botswana. It is found in the eastern parts of the Okavango Delta - home to one of Africa's richest ecosystems. The reserve homes the region's major herbivores and carnivores, and there have been recent reintroductions of Black and White Rhinos, making it a Big Five destination. Here, visitors can enjoy game-viewing in abundance and be amazed by the Delta's prolific birdlife. Explore this wildlife wonder by vehicle, foot, traditional mokoro, or horseback safaris. Boat cruises, elephant interactions, helicopter rides and walking safaris are all activities offered at Moremi. 

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Moremi Game Reserve
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