Kenya

Resting in the magnificent Great Rift Valley and presided over by the majestic Mount Kilimanjaro, Kenya is characterised by hauntingly beautiful natural landscapes of forested hills, patchwork farms, wooded savanna and vast forests brimming with an extraordinary abundance of wildlife. The nation’s diverse range of traditional African cultures is influenced by over 70 unique ethnic groups from the Maasai, Samburu, Kikuyu, and Turkana tribes to the Arabs and Indians that settled on the coast. Add to this: an exquisite tropical coastline fringed with breathtaking golden sand beaches; gorgeous coral gardens providing excellent snorkeling and diving opportunities; and a slew of lively beach resorts, and it is easy to see why so many visitors flock here from around the world to experience a truly unique African adventure in one of the world’s most pristine safari destinations.

Nairobi

Days 1 - 2

Situated along the Nairobi River in beautiful Kenya, the capital of Nairobi is East Africa's most cosmopolitan city. It serves as an excellent starting point for African safari trips around Kenya. Nairobi is Africa’s 4th largest city and is a vibrant and exciting place to be. There are some fascinating attractions: its cafe culture, unbridled nightlife, the National Museum, the Karen Blixen Museum and most notably, just 20 minutes from the city centre, wild lions and buffalo roam in the world’s only urban game reserve. Make sure you pay a visit to the elephant orphanage operated by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust for a once in a lifetime experience.

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Nairobi

Diani Beach

Days 2 - 5

With its gorgeous palm trees, powder white sand, and glistening azure waters, Diani Beach is a popular resort area on Kenya’s magnificent Indian Ocean shoreline, about 30 kilometres south of Mombasa. Warm seas and exquisite coral reefs are the ideal environments for water-based activities including snorkeling, scuba diving, and boat safaris. Divers are likely to see turtles, mantas, barracuda and, if lucky, possibly even the elusive whale shark, the planet’s largest animal. Don’t miss the Colobus Conservation, a wonderful sanctuary for these fascinating endangered primates; the Shimba Hills National Reserve which offers an exceptional safari experience; and the nearby Kisite Marine National Park, known for its dolphin and turtle sightings. An array of excellent shops and alluring sea-facing restaurants completes the package of this destination.

Accommodation

Amani Tiwi Beach Resort

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Diani Beach

Tsavo West National Park

Days 5 - 7

Located in Kenya's Coast Province, Tsavo West National Park stretches for over 9000 square kilometres and is one of Kenya’s most impressive parks. Tsavo West’s spectacular natural scenery includes volcanic cones, swamps, rocky outcrops and lava flows, mountains, river forests, plains, lakes, natural springs, and wooded grassland. The other-worldly, black, layering Shetani Lava Flows, named after the devil, spreads over the savannah. Other incredible natural attractions include the awe-inspiring Chaimu Crater; the Roaring Rocks, offering panoramic views; and the gorgeous Mzima Springs, the main source of water for the Tsavo River. Animal lovers will enjoy the chance to see highly endangered black rhinos at the Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, and a list of other animals in the park including large herds of elephants, common waterbuck, eland, buffalo, gerenuk, fringe-eared oryx, impala, and Maasai giraffe.

Accommodation

Severin Safari Camp

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Tsavo West National Park

Nairobi

Days 7 - 8

As previously described

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Nairobi

Aberdare

Days 8 - 10

Situated in the magnificent Aberdare Highlands, northeast of Nairobi, Aberdare is an amazing highland safari area featuring mountains, lush forests and steep ravines teeming with the best of Africa's varied wildlife including the majestic elephant and rhino. This area is made up of the Abedare Mountain Range, which forms part of the eastern side of the Great Rift Valley as well as a vast savanna covered moorland plateau. The sheer natural beauty of Abedare has placed it on the UNESCO World Heritage list and draws visitors from all corners of the globe.

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Aberdare

Lake Elmenteita

Days 10 - 12

Elmenteita, meaning ‘place of dust’, is a photogenic, little soda lake situated in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley. Famously attracting many visiting flamingos as well as many other birds, it has been named as a World Heritage Site for its prolific birdlife. This is where Kenya’s most famous settler Lord Delamere lived and he was responsible for much of Kenya’s early agricultural experimentation in this fertile area; it is still inhabited by some of his descendants. The shores are often filled with wildlife and the surrounding forests are perfect for long walks and bird watching. Visitors can look forward to visiting the idyllic Kekopey hot springs, game viewing along the lake’s edge, and numerous other activities. Look out for eland, kudu, zebra, gazelle, and warthog families.

Accommodation

Sunbird Lodge

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Lake Elmenteita

Kisumu

Days 12 - 14

Resting on the shores of the magnificent Lake Victoria, the laidback port city of Kisumu is the third largest city in Kenya. This city features wide streets, fine colonial architecture and boasts great viewpoints over the lake at Hippo point and Dunga Hill Camp. It is home to the Kisumu Impala Sanctuary, which shelters herds of free roaming impalas and zebras as well as an animal orphanage caring for lions, cheetahs, leopards, baboons, duikers, hyena and buffaloes. Visitors to the city can look forward to an array of wonderful attractions including: the Kisumu Museum, which displays local cultural artifacts and the nearby Ruma National Park, which protects the only indigenous population of rare roan antelopes within Kenya and features sheer cliffs, diverse wildlife and many species of bird.

Accommodation

Acacia Premier

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Kisumu

Masai Mara

Days 14 - 16

The Masai Mara together with Tanzania’s Serengeti form Africa’s most famous wildlife park, the Masai Mara National Reserve. The image of acacia trees dotting endless grass plains epitomises Africa for many, then add a Maasai warrior and some cattle to the picture and the conversation need go no further. The undeniable highlight of the Masai Mara National Reserve is undoubtedly the annual wildebeest migration traversing the vast plains of the Serengeti and the Masai Mara. It is known as the largest mass movement of land mammals on the planet – with more than a million animals following the rains. Large prides of lions, herds of elephants, as well as giraffes, gazelles and eland can also be spotted in the reserve. Aside from horse riding safaris and traditional vehicle safaris, hot-air ballooning over the Mara plains has become almost essential.

Accommodation

Mara Concord Game Lodge

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Masai Mara

Tanzania

The name Tanzania conjures up images of wildebeest stampeding across vast savannah, rain forests teeming with monkeys and birdlife, and great plains brimming with legions of game. All of these natural wonders and more are on offer in this exceptionally diverse African nation. Visitors typically visit Tanzania to partake in at least one of the four well known Tanzanian tourist experiences: a relaxing seaside vacation on the picturesque island paradise of Zanzibar, an underwater tour of some of the world’s most renowned dive sites around the gorgeous Spice Islands, a safari adventure in some of Africa’s most impressive game reserves, or a hiking excursion around Mount Kilimanjaro National Park. Whichever of these incredible holidays you choose, you will undoubtedly be welcomed by some fabulously friendly and peaceful inhabitants who, despite being divided into 120 different ethnic groups and cultures, live in harmony with one another and provide some of the most wonderfully exotic local cuisine you could imagine. With all of this diversity on offer, the most difficult part of your Tanzanian holiday experience is likely to be deciding where to go!

Eastern Serengeti

Days 16 - 17

The rich acacia-dotted plains of the Eastern Serengeti are home to abundant wildlife. Visitors flock here to view the world-renowned wildebeest migration. Some of the best game-viewing can be enjoyed from Lobo on the eastern edge of the Serengeti National Park along the Grumeti River. Popular activities include: taking a guided walk through the spectacularly scenic terrain of the wild Serengeti, jumping on a hot air balloon safari, picnics in the bush, and learning about Maasai culture and history. Don’t miss the opportunity to visit the world famous Gol Kopjes for the best cheetah viewing in Africa.

Accommodation

Mawe Luxury Tented Camp

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Eastern Serengeti

Eastern Serengeti

Days 17 - 18

As previously described

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Eastern Serengeti

Karatu

Days 18 - 19

Travellers heading for the Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater will pass through the town of Karatu in the green hills of Tanzania’s northern highlands. Presided over by the towering Ol Deani Volcano, this small, colourful town serves as a popular overnight stop for visitors exploring the area’s many game parks. The town offers a variety of activities including browsing the bustling marketplace, sampling beer at a local brewery, visiting a traditional homestead, or taking a guided walk through the Ngorongoro Forest in search of waterfalls and caves. Whether you are looking for cultural tours, hiking and biking opportunities, a chance to enjoy an authentic rural Tanzania experience, or simply a break between safari game drives, this underrated town has plenty to offer.

Accommodation

Country Lodge Karatu

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Karatu

Stone Town

Days 19 - 20

Situated on the western coast of Zanzibar’s Unguja Island, UNESCO-listed Stone Town is the oldest part of Zanzibar City and is the cultural heart of the island. The town’s photogenic winding alleys are fringed by grand historic buildings, bustling bazaars, a glorious sultan’s palace, and the intriguing House of Wonders - named as such for exhibiting running water and electricity as never before in 1883. Stone Town also boasts numerous sacred buildings - over fifty mosques, six Hindu Temples, a Catholic, and an Anglican Cathedral - all of which are beautiful in unique ways. Other highlights include sunset dhow cruises; spice tours to aromatic distilleries; and neighbouring Changuu Island, home to stunning sandy beaches, a historic prison, and dozens of giant, ancient tortoises.

Accommodation

Tembo House Hotel

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Stone Town

Bwejuu

Days 20 - 22

Forming part of the spectacularly scenic Zanzibar Archipelago, the island of Unguja is home to the charming village of Bwejuu. It is a seaside village situated on the southeastern coast just below the magnificent Michamvi Peninsula. This tropical island paradise features unspoilt white-sand beaches shaded by palms and fringed by crystalline waters. Home to an array of luxury resorts and charming retreats, Bwejuu caters to all tastes. For those looking to venture beyond the relaxing island resort life and want to explore further afield, bikes and scooters can be rented in the village. Travellers flock here to discover the natural beauty of the idyllic coastline and all its hidden treasures. Popular activities include: swimming, snorkelling, diving, kitesurfing and spending slow days soaking up the African sun on pristine picture-perfect beaches.

Accommodation

Evergreen Bungalows

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Bwejuu

Ethiopia

Situated in the Horn of Africa, Ethiopia boasts extraordinary natural features, a vast range of wildlife, and a captivating historical and cultural heritage. An increasing number of visitors are frequenting this treasure trove filled with unique attractions. Popular attractions include: the medieval castles of Gondar; the walled city of Harar; and Lalibela, a pilgrimage site known for its ancient monolithic churches, hewn into the area’s steep rocky hillsides. Ethiopia’s stunning natural landscapes are the real tourist drawcard. From the lush Simien Mountains to the sulphur vents of the Danakil Depression, the country’s outstanding natural environment is unforgettable. Bahir Dar, located on Lake Tana, is popular as a base from which to explore the fascinating monasteries situated on the numerous islands dotted around the lake, as well as the Blue Nile Falls, which are arguably the most spectacular falls in North Africa.

Addis Ababa

Days 22 - 23

Located in the highlands fringing the Great Rift Valley, Addis Ababa serves as the political, cultural and commercial centre of Ethiopia. This sprawling city rests in the foothills of the Entoto Mountains and features a mix of traditional homes, elegant villas, and tall office buildings. Visitors can look forward to a selection of wonderful activities including: visiting the National Museum, displaying local art, traditional crafts and prehistoric fossils; exploring the copper-domed Holy Trinity Cathedral, a Neo-Baroque architectural landmark; and sampling rich Ethiopian coffee as well as the memorable cuisine featuring spicy stews and Ethiopia’s signature Injera bread.

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Addis Ababa

Harar

Days 23 - 24

Situated in eastern Ethiopia, the historic fortified town of Harar once served as the gateway for the spread of Islam into the Horn of Africa as it was the commercial hub between the Middle East, India and Africa. This sacred Muslim town is set on a vast plateau surrounded by deserts and savannah. It is said to be the fourth holiest city of Islam and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Harar is known for its ancient cultural heritage, boasting over 80 different mosques and 100 shrines dotted around town; as well as its exceptional architecture, displaying a blend of African and Islamic influences. Visitors can meander down bustling labyrinthine streets lined with colourful market stalls, and visit the vibrant Awodai Khat Market - this area of Ethiopia is the world’s number one producer of this stimulating shrub.

Accommodation

Wonderland Hotel

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Harar

Bishoftu

Days 24 - 25

Formerly known as Debre Zeyit, meaning ‘Mount of Olives’, Bishoftu is a flourishing resort town located only 50 kilometres from the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa. Due to its proximity to the capital, the town serves as a popular alternate overnight stopover for travellers looking to avoid the frenetic chaos of the city. The main visitor attraction is a collection of four exquisite crater lakes set within steep volcanic calderas dotted with a range of resorts catering to all tastes and budgets. The lakes include: Lake Bishoftu, Lake Bishoftu Guda, Lake Koriftu, Lake Hora, and the seasonal non-volcanic Lake Cheleklaka. While Lake Hora offers an impressive array of watersports, birding enthusiasts should head to Lake Chelekleka which hosts impressive numbers of flamingo and pelican together with a wide variety of resident and migrant waterfowl and shorebirds.

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Bishoftu

Goba

Days 25 - 27

Goba is located in south-central Ethiopia. This friendly destination is best-known for providing convenient access to the activity-rich Bale Mountains National Park, though it does also boast a number of other sights and activities for visitors to enjoy. Take a walk (or catch a bus) to the remains of an old Rock Church on the outskirts of town, and don’t miss the popular Wednesday Market, where the region’s long tradition of basket-weaving is on full display, and where cotton shawls and locally-produced honey make great gifts. Located just 10 kilometres away, the Bale Mountains National Park is a must for nature lovers – being home to more than a quarter of Ethiopia’s native animal species, as well as 280 species of birds and diverse landscapes ranging from grasslands to forests, meadows and mountain peaks.

Accommodation

Goba Wabe Shebelle Hotel

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Goba

Hawassa

Days 27 - 28

Situated on the shores of Lake Awassa, Hawassa serves as the capital of southern Ethiopia. Also known as Awassa or Awasa, it is one of the country’s fastest growing settlements and is establishing itself as a popular resort town with a variety of attractions including a bustling market, a vibrant nightlife and impressive cultural sites like the St. Gabriel Orthodox Church. Visitors are also treated to splendid views of the lake and the Great Rift Valley beyond it. The lake offers great opportunities for fishing, bird watching and even catching a glimpse of some lurking local hippos.

Accommodation

Haile Resort

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Hawassa

Arba Minch

Days 28 - 29

Situated in southern Ethiopia at the base of the western side of the Great Rift Valley, the city of Arba Minch is the largest city in the Gamo Gofa Zone. Surrounded by forested mountains and home to two of Ethiopia’s largest Rift Valley Lakes, Arba Minch is named after the abundant springs found in the area. This resort town rests on the edge of Lake Chamo where it has a stunning view of the aptly named ‘Bridge of God’, an isthmus that separates Lake Chamo from the neighbouring Lake Abaya. This stretch of land is home to zebras, gazelle, kudus and other wildlife. The Dorze village is also a popular attraction in Arba Minch – here tourists can visit the famous beehive huts built by the Dorze tribe.

Accommodation

Paradise Lodge

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Arba Minch

Jinka

Days 29 - 30

Located in southwestern Ethiopia, near the borders of Sudan and Kenya, Jinka is the largest town in the Debub Omo Zone. It serves as an excellent base from which to explore the surrounding area. This remote market town is home to the Mursi people, who are well known for their elaborate lip plates made of clay. At the South Omo Research Center and Museum, visitors can learn more about the Mursi, as well as other groups in the region, through a series of exhibits detailing the cultures and customs of local tribes. Nature enthusiasts will enjoy the nearby Mago National Park, where abundant wildlife finds shelter in the dense acacia woodland.

Accommodation

Jinka Resort

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Jinka

Turmi

Days 30 - 33

This small market town in southwestern Ethiopia functions as a central transport hub as well as an important meeting point for the area’s weekly Monday market. The local Hamer inhabitants of the surrounding villages flock here to buy and sell local produce and handicrafts. Visitors to the area can enjoy culturally fascinating guided tours of the surrounding villages. Popular cultural attractions include traditional Hamer dance performances and exhilarating ‘Jumping of the Bulls’ ceremonies which form the culmination of a three-day long rite of passage for any young man within the Hamer tribe.Turmi is a great choice of destination for travellers in search of a unique and authentic African experience in one of the most remote places on the continent.

Accommodation

Buska Lodge

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Turmi

Arba Minch

Days 33 - 34

As previously described

Accommodation

Paradise Lodge

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Arba Minch
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