The Great Namibian Journey

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Namib-Naukluft National Park

Days 3 - 5

Stretching almost 50000 square kilometres across the red-orange sands of the Namib Desert over the Naukluft Mountains to the east, the Namib-Naukluft National Park is Africa’s biggest wildlife reserve and the fourth largest in the world. Despite the unforgiving conditions, it is inhabited by a plethora of desert-adapted animals, including reptiles, buck, hyenas, jackals, insects and a variety of bird species. One of the main attractions of the park are the ancient dunes of Sossusvlei, home to some of the tallest dunes in the world rising over 300 metres from the desert floor. This magnificent landscape features, rolling dunes, rugged moonscapes, lagoons, wetlands and mudflats. Visitors can look forward to a number of impressive sights including: the picture-perfect Dune 45, standing 170 metres high; the Welwitschia Plains, otherworldly lunar terrain dotted with the endemic plants; and the Dead Vlei, a photographers dream.

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Namib-Naukluft National Park

Swakopmund

Days 5 - 6

Set along Namibia's spectacularly scenic coast, the seaside town of Swakopmund is known for its wide-open avenues, colonial architecture, and its surrounding otherworldly desert terrain. Founded in 1892 as the main harbour for German South-West Africa, Swakopmund is often described as being more German than Germany. Now a seaside resort town, Swakopmund is the capital of the Skeleton Coast tourism area and has plenty to keep visitors happy. The quirky mix of German and Namibian influences, adventure options, laid-back atmosphere and cool sea breeze make it a very popular Namibian destination. Visitors can look forward to a number of exciting activities including: quad biking, horse riding, paragliding, fishing, sightseeing and fascinating desert tours.

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Swakopmund

Twyfelfontein

Days 6 - 8

Set in the Kunene Region of northwestern Namibia, Twyfelfontein is a spectacularly scenic area, featuring one of the largest and most important concentrations of rock art in Africa. The name ‘Twyfelfontein’ translates to ‘Fountain of Doubt’, which refers to the perennial spring situated in the impressive Huab Valley flanked by the slopes of a sandstone table mountain. It was this spring that attracted Stone Age hunters over six thousand years ago, and it was during this time that the extensive group of rock engravings and paintings were produced. Visitors can look forward to basing themselves at some wonderfully shady campsites along the Aba-Huab riverbed, while exploring over thirty different sacred ritual sites of the traditional hunter-gatherer communities.

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Twyfelfontein

Ongava Private Game Reserve

Days 8 - 10

Ongava Game Reserve

Sharing the southern boundary with Etosha National Park, the prolific 30 000-hectare private Ongava Game Reserve is considered one of the top private game reserves in the region, enjoying global recognition for exceptional conservation, groundbreaking research and exciting safari experiences. The landscape is characterised by vast open plains dotted with salt plans and abundant wildlife. Visitors can easily access Etosha through Andersson’s Gate in the south.

Known for its luxury lodges made out of natural materials, Ogava is a popular destination for those looking to immerse themselves in nature. The reserve offers visitors the perfect combination of wildlife safari experiences within and around the Etosha National Park. One of Ongava’s top attractions is its rhino population and guests can experience the thrill of getting close to these majestic creatures. Popular activities include: night game drives, guided nature walks, bird watching and 4x4 guided game drives.

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Ongava Private Game Reserve
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